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Boombox Repair/Restoration Kit


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#31 riker1068

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 10:35 AM

Great find. FD what do you use the Meguiars Plast-X polish for.
 



#32 Jedidiah

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 05:30 PM

What to use on to clean the PCB board?

I use denatured alcohol and tooth brushes on my vintage home audio gear (mid 70s) and trust me that stuff can be caked with flux sometimes.



#33 baddboybill

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 07:09 PM

Any ideas on why my panasonic RX 5100 would start to make a loud tone sound when I push the play button? It is a very clean unit but now no sound from tape player except this loud tone. Thanks!


Clean your record bar inside on PC board ;-)


Bad Boy Bill

#34 eli

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 04:59 PM

this is an excellent post and I have learned a great deal from it--thanks for starting it...

 

Just wanted to add two items to the kit---

 

Now that i am officially a Geezer--- light to see by when working on box internals is a big thing for me--

I keep one of those--elastic band, super bright, led headlamps in my kit--bought mine from a camping place.

An additional plus with it is both hands free to work--

 

I keep a few thick, Jazz player, guitar picks in there as well, to use when a casing needs to be leveraged open--less chance

of gouging the casing while prying areas open if they are stuck/tight---has to be jazz picks tho--standard picks are too thin.



#35 toshik

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 05:13 PM

sandpaper or fingernailfile for rusty, corroded battery spring and contacts

 I never scrape the rusty spots - scraping them even with steel wool would leave them look scraped :-)

Also it would remove the protective coating and rust would be right back...  

 Treat them with LPS-3 it would remove most surface rust plus seal and protect the area for good (it leaves a special protective coating layer).

I use the scope and audio generator as well.



#36 Superduper

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 07:50 PM

 I never scrape the rusty spots - scraping them even with steel wool would leave them look scraped :-)

Also it would remove the protective coating and rust would be right back...  

 Treat them with LPS-3 it would remove most surface rust plus seal and protect the area for good (it leaves a special protective coating layer).

Obviously, that depends entirely on the severity of the rust.  I have seen rusted battery terminals where connectivity was difficult to restore even after removing the metal plate and working it with a bench grinder fitted with brushes.  The rust and battery acid combined to chemically convert the surface to a non conductive material.  As LPS-3 is a rust inhibitor, that alone would not have been effective as the "protective" nickel would've been long gone, and the task would be akin to closing the gates after the horses have already left the barn.



#37 toshik

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 08:28 PM

As LPS-3 is a rust inhibitor, that alone would not have been effective as the "protective" nickel would've been long gone, and the task would be akin to closing the gates after the horses have already left the barn.

 

Apparently you randomly used LPS-3 - all it does it removes the surface rust and leaves protective oily film guaranteed to protect the surface even outside!

It does not darken the metal surface like other "inhibitors" normally do thus requiring additional coating.



#38 Superduper

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 09:28 PM

You didn't read my post clearly or misunderstood what I said.

#39 Alberto

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 03:44 PM

A decent soldering station should also be in your "Boom Box Restoration Kit". You can pick up a decent soldering station for about $100.00. Here are three;

 

HAKKO FX-888D

 

WELLER WES 51

 

EDSYN LONER 951SX

 

I have the HAKKO FX-888D and I love it. It has a digital read out and 5 preset temperatures that you can custom adjust. :-D  



#40 MyOhMy

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 11:54 AM

Great thread!  Here are some of the other things I've found useful that'll add to the list:

 

 

A selection of small lights including a telescopic light with a magnetic head (dropped screw pick-up!).

 

Nail brush for dry brushing dust/fluff from grills, casing grooves etc..

 

Rubber eraser or pencil with eraser, good for preventing spinning of rollers whilst cleaning them.

 

Telescopic mirror.

 

Small elliptical mirror, very good for awkward and difficult spaces.

 

Marker pens - I use for marking connectors so I know which one is which and which way round they sit!

 

Angled tweezers.

 

Fluffy, bendy pipe cleaners, used for removing fluff if wet and as temporary ties on cables to keep the together or out of the way.

 

Magnifiers - small hand held and desk top.

 

Magnetic screwdriver(s).

 

Home made small double-ended hook, particularly useful when refitting tuning strings.

 

:morepics:

Attached File  DSCF0297.JPG   433.16K   7 downloads

 

I hope this is of use to those starting out - Like ME!  :-)

 



#41 Ambience

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 08:46 PM

Nice one guys! For me a must that's missing here is an electric screw gun with long driver bits, I use a Dewalt with LEDs surrounding the head of the gun, and a 6 or 9 inch Phillips driver. Makes quick work when disassembing and reassembling these bad boys.


To add on top of the McGuire wax, I'd say some 3000 or higher grit paper for cleaning up nasty old boxes and plastic view windows. Does wonders.

Last, but not least, I use tooth picks to clean tight crevices. Especially helpful after using wax that ends up drying in strange places.Attached File  DSC_1097.JPG   82.46K   5 downloads

#42 MyOhMy

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Posted 13 October 2015 - 10:21 AM

I've recently acquired a turntable to make life a little more comfortable and find it very useful indeed.  Turntables are usually lightweight, turn with absolute ease, are available in many styles and types, manual or motor driven.  Mine is manual, 16" across, made with plastic and was sold as a 'mobility aid' because it can take the weight of quite a hefty adult.

 

I've used a little bubble-wrap packing inside an old pillowcase for padding.  As it can take quite a weight it's quite possible to increase the surface area with a board to accept the separated BB front & rear casings that still have the ol' umbilical cord attached!

 

Attached File  DSCF0739.JPG   610.94K   12 downloads

 

Attached File  DSCF0743.JPG   316.11K   11 downloads



#43 toshik

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Posted 23 October 2015 - 08:14 PM

Did everyone miss the alignment cassette for speed/level adjustment?



#44 T-STER

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Posted 24 October 2015 - 03:35 AM

Do you buy these or make them?



#45 toshik

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Posted 24 October 2015 - 06:41 AM

Cassettes? I made one for myself with my CT-F1250 if someone needs them let me know.



#46 T-STER

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Posted 24 October 2015 - 03:23 PM

Excuse my ignorance. This is one tape then that you can use to check allignment and speed? If so it sounds  useful to me



#47 toshik

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Posted 24 October 2015 - 03:28 PM

Yes correct recorded on calibrated deck with set test tone and level.



#48 T-STER

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Posted 25 October 2015 - 03:03 AM

Ah I see, I will have to get one of these, Are they commercially available, im guessing not.



#49 toshik

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Posted 25 October 2015 - 07:03 AM

Ah I see, I will have to get one of these, Are they commercially available, im guessing not.

 

I'll put an ad with the price for them later.

http://boomboxery.co...ettes-for-sale/



#50 BoomboxLover48

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 07:25 AM

We missed a few more...

 

 

  • Signal injector to trace signal path
  • Safety glasses for Eye protection
  • Nylon thread to pull out knobs. Slip it under the knob and pull. That is a must to remove the tuning and volume knobs of Sharp VZ2000 and many other knobs. Wrap the other ends of the thread on a stick and pull gently.
  • light grease of white Li grease for lubricating mechanical parts
  • Light oil like 3 in 1 machine oil or Singer machine oil for the capstan bearings.
  • Q tips
  • Foam pads
  • Precision screw driver set
  • Painters tape at critical places to avoid scratches. (It is easy to scratch the top panel edges of Sharp GF9696 if one don't put an inch wide painters tape before assembly. The front cover top can easily get misaligned and scratch up the top panel) 
  • Easy access to washroom from the work area. Beer, whiskey, bourbon, plus the work pressure will need frequent visits...  :lol:
  • :-D  :-D :lol:  want to keep this thread alive....


#51 MyOhMy

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 08:02 AM

"Nylon thread to pull out knobs" - YES - YES - YES!!!  Oh, thank you, Royce!   :thumbsup:

 

Now I know where I've been going so wrong when pulling & tugging at the expense of several broken fingernails! :blush:  :lol:



#52 BoomboxLover48

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 08:40 AM

"Nylon thread to pull out knobs" - YES - YES - YES!!!  Oh, thank you, Royce!   :thumbsup:

 

Now I know where I've been going so wrong when pulling & tugging at the expense of several broken fingernails! :blush:  :lol:

:-D  :-D Save those pretty nails sister!

 

Another tool I really like is the Craftsman bottle opener.

 

The rubber on it easily grabs on the knobs and we can pull it if there is enough surface area on the knob to grab on with it.

 

I mostly use this rubber and wrap on the knob to pull them out. Works with less effort.

Attached Files



#53 MyOhMy

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 12:39 PM

:-D  :-D Save those pretty nails sister!

 

Another tool I really like is the Craftsman bottle opener.

 

The rubber on it easily grabs on the knobs and we can pull it if there is enough surface area on the knob to grab on with it.

 

I mostly use this rubber and wrap on the knob to pull them out. Works with less effort.

 

Yep, I have one of those handy tools and....................a pair of rubber(ised) washing up gloves - excellent traction. :yes:



#54 hopey

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Posted 24 February 2017 - 05:58 AM

Bicycle spoke to install belts in tight places.

#55 Norm1968

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 05:53 PM

Hi
Do any of you know of a place where we can get (or buy online) parts for our boomboxes from the 80’s. Not easy to find.
Thanks

#56 ELzekio

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 07:10 PM

Lets not forget a good ESR meter to test capasitors in circuit. Just because the capasitor may have the rated capasitance, it still may have issues.

I suggest buying one from the inventor of it and not just a cheep china one on ebay.


http://clientes.netv...eenpal/evb1.htm