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Boombox Repair/Restoration Kit


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#1 monkeysee

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 03:44 PM

What would be essential Items for a newbie just starting out ?

What is the best way to remove 20 years of dirt,dust,nicotine etc without damaging the finish?

#2 Fatdog

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 04:00 PM

Well, here's my list of usual items. Maybe I'll round everything up and take a pic:

* Various assortment of flat-head and Phillips screwdrivers including miniature sizes
* Soldering gun
* Needle-nose pliers
* Tweezers
* Small telescoping magnet
* Q-tips / cotton swabs
* Isopropyl alcohol
* Meguiars Plast-X polish
* Endust wipes for electronics
* Orange Glo
* DeOxit
* TDK electronic demagnetizing cassette
* R/C fuel tubing
* Assortment of dental-type picks
* Multimeter
* Test tape
* X-acto knife (or similar)
* 2-inch paint brush

For basic cleaning, just go with a mild detergent and water. For tough stains, grime, grease, and dirt, Orange Glo works wonders!! Just don't use too much of it. ;-)

#3 Master Z

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 04:06 PM

Nice list FD, other things I use include;
- A multimeter
- test tape
- RCA cords to test in/out puts
- Paper clips (I use them to pull dents out of grills/ and to clean real tight places. works well.)
- A working boombox so you can listen to while you work!
- Beer or liquor for the real tough to figure out problems.
- A digital camera to document and post up on Boomboxery!

Peace.
Paul Z. :cool:

#4 Fatdog

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 04:08 PM

Nice list FD, other things I use include;
- A multimeter
- test tape

DOH! How could I forget those?! :-O I've updated my list. Thanks MZ. :-)

#5 Fatdog

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 04:12 PM

Let me go ahead and post Vladi's response to this thread:

"Single malt scotch - I won't open another boombox without it."

:lol: :beer2:

#6 monkeysee

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 04:15 PM

Thanks Guys for your response :thumbsup:

#7 JVC Floyd

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 04:18 PM

you can also dismantle the box and wash all non electronic parts in the bath tub ,then when it's dry put it all back together ,you can dust the speakers and the guts while its apart.

#8 stynger007

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 07:46 AM

Use WD-40 to remove sticker glue ( I hate stickers on boxes!) First remove sticker by hand best you can, next spray on wd 40 slowly, let it penetrate, then wipe away glue! Recommend trying it on an unconspicuous area like the bottom in case the finish decides to come off with it.. ;-)

#9 Fatdog

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 08:09 AM

If WD-40 proves to strong for the finish of the box, you can also try Goo Gone's Sticker Lifter. Although it might make sense to test it also. ;-)

Posted Image

#10 spatterlight

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Posted 08 April 2011 - 11:34 AM

The other day, I spent two hours pulling a bunch of twenty-year-old Toronto Blue Jays stickers off an old Panasonic RX 5080. I found that different glue residues needed different cleaning liquids to really come off easy, but the winner for me was plain white vinegar. Plus my thumbnail beats the pants off a sink scrubby for glue lifting action.

#11 kingrat2010

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Posted 08 April 2011 - 12:00 PM

microfibre cloth ;-)
sandpaper or fingernailfile for rusty, corroded battery spring and contacts
chrome polish, finisher

#12 li432paul

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Posted 16 April 2011 - 10:57 AM

great tips !!!

#13 mindstate612

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 09:06 PM

I love the list fellas, I just started taking apart some of the projects I have... I find it myself very content and entertained detailing these old boxes that have been collecting dust for many years. :w00t: :w00t: I've been learning the small tricks of the trades through making a few mistakes here and there. Now if I could just figure out the smartest way to remove the grills so I can clean and repaint them.

#14 baddboybill

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 01:02 AM

I love the list fellas, I just started taking apart some of the projects I have... I find it myself very content and entertained detailing these old boxes that have been collecting dust for many years. :w00t: :w00t: I've been learning the small tricks of the trades through making a few mistakes here and there. Now if I could just figure out the smartest way to remove the grills so I can clean and repaint them.

On your SCR8 you need to bend all tabs and cut glue with razor, then evenly push grill out...Good luck ;-)

#15 blu_fuz

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 06:42 AM

Don't forget things to fix damaged boomboxes! Acrylic Cement is the best and everyone should have it "just in case" ;-) :yes: :thumbsup:

#16 mindstate612

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 07:53 PM

Don't forget things to fix damaged boomboxes! Acrylic Cement is the best and everyone should have it "just in case" ;-) :yes: :thumbsup:





what brand makes the best Acrylic Cement? :hmmm:

#17 blu_fuz

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 09:06 PM

Here is a great thread!:

viewtopic.php?f=47&t=4420&hilit=cracks


Superduper referred me to some awesome stuff, I just got it a few days ago and I will never look back either! :thumbsup:

#18 bobdog

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Posted 13 May 2011 - 03:22 PM

.....As you are also UK based...check out maplins/ rs componants or cpc for Servisol products....
Great switch cleaner and they do a foam cleaner you can just spray all over and work in with an old tooth brush....works a treat!

#19 spindiesel

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Posted 16 July 2011 - 01:22 AM

Excellent thread, really appreciate the tips

#20 Ser182

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 09:12 AM

What to use on to clean the PCB board?

#21 bantytfv

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Posted 29 November 2011 - 02:27 AM

I use Momar brand, "On Board" contact and circuit board cleaner for the PCB's and the switches and potentiometers. Works well, and evaporates fast.

#22 The Box of Boom

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 05:00 AM

Let me go ahead and post Vladi's response to this thread:

"Single malt scotch - I won't open another boombox without it."

:lol: :beer2:


My current restoration needs more scotch ... I knew I was missing something

#23 Brutus442

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 02:36 PM

Wow, I'm glad I found this thread.

Two additions to this "repair/ rebuild" kit I'd suggest is small wire wraps (they can hold/ bundle wires away while working on other components) and are easily cut after completion.

The last suggestion is more for those of us who are somewhat colour blind. Simple "peel and stick" letters or numbers can be used to tag and document wire or harness locations. These are available at most electronic supply stores.

I hope this helps! :breakdance:

P.S I'd move the single malt to the top of the list! :w00t: :angelic:

#24 perkins7

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 10:13 PM

Hi ! my first post on this amazing site , i use isopropilic alcohol to clean PCB , and a local cleanner called " Silijet" its very safe with controls, switchs and residual free , its very close to results on WD-40 rust off !! (sorry , my natal lenguage its Spanish) :blush:

#25 trippy1313

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 12:41 AM

I was curious, what do you all use for speaker cleaning?  If dusting doesn't prove strong enough to clean, is there anything you feel safe cleaning them with?  Here's my what M70 speakers look like.

Attached File  20130818_224947.jpg   62.6K   17 downloads

 



#26 superlew

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 04:11 AM

I was curious, what do you all use for speaker cleaning?  If dusting doesn't prove strong enough to clean, is there anything you feel safe cleaning them with?  Here's my what M70 speakers look like.

attachicon.gif20130818_224947.jpg

I usually start with a stiff artist brush for the heavy stuff. It works great in the W-surrounds, too. Then, to get the cones as clean as possible, I'll sometimes go over them with a tack cloth. This method should work pretty well on M70 speakers, since they have a smooth paper cone. Often times, spills and splashes will leave the cones stained or discolored. In the case of the M70, I'd leave it. Once they're mounted behind the grills, most people won't even notice. A light spray is really just a last resort for cones that are super-visible and look really bad after they're installed.

Another thing I've done a few times is to treat the W-surrounds. Sometimes they will have small tears. I cover the tears from the back side with a tiny piece of toilet paper - yes, toilet paper. I work the T.P. into the surround with a tiny amount of speaker glue and an artist brush. I apply a very thin coat of the glue to the entire back side of the surround to reinforce it.

It can be tedious, but well worth the effort if the surrounds are less than perfect.

You can never have too many artist brushes. I pick them up at Michael's Craft Stores for $5.00 for 25 brushes. Tack cloths are $3.00 for 2 at Home Depot. They last a long time if you store them in a zip-lock bag.



#27 trippy1313

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 02:48 PM

Perfect, tack rags come easy, so do paint brushes.



#28 superlew

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 05:09 PM

Thought I'd share this.

This is how I stay organized. Even when I have multiple ongoing projects. These containers are really cheap. I start from the top, left to right, in order of disassembly. Makes re-assembly a breeze. Just work backwards. They're great when you have components with different fasteners that look similar. Now I never wonder, "Is it this screw or this one?" And I don't move on to the next step until the previous compartment is empty.

If every part and fastener in the container was removed from the unit, it needs to go back in.

There's no such thing as "extra parts," contrary to what my dad told me. :lol:

 

Attached File  Organization.JPG   62.46K   19 downloads



#29 Pelzwik

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 05:56 PM

Any ideas on why my panasonic RX 5100 would start to make a loud tone sound when I push the play button?  It is a very clean unit but now no sound from tape player except this loud tone.  Thanks!  



#30 JT Techno

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:58 AM

Did anybody mention baby wipes - if not, I'd add a pack of these in to the list - they are great at getting all sorts of muck off all non-electrical parts of a boombox - I'm amazing they don't take the skin off a baby too but somehow they can take hardened paint off a boombox but leave a baby still smiling ;-)