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Finally! A Near ENDLESS Supply Of Chrome Dustcaps!


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#1 Gluecifer

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 01:54 AM

If you're like me you have a fetish for big chrome dustcaps on your woofers. Anyone who's been into replacing speakers with modern ones will soon find out that 99% of them don't have chrome or metallic dustcaps, instead going for boring black or another flat colour. So for the last few weeks I've been wracking my brains for a simple solution to this problem as with my latest custom I really wanted big chrome dustcaps on the speakers I replaced the super woofers with.

 

After weeks of searching online and looking for a possible way to fabricate something a true epiphany occurred, and from this point on, none of us out there lusting for shiny metallic dustcaps on their speakers shall want no more!!

 

How I hear you ask? Well, like most good ideas it's pretty simple. In my quest to find the right convex metal shape I realised the bottom of every single metal spray can has the right shape with just the right diameter. To turn them into dustcaps is a 10 minute process.

 

I emptied a couple of spray cans completely so there was no pressure in the cans, you can tell when there is no pressure as you can push the sides in easily. Choosing the right spray can is a good idea, I used spray paint for this project, but spray lubricants or cleaners would be even easier. Also, the smaller the can the smaller the dustcap, of course, so electrical cleaner cans, that we've probably all got a few empties lying around, will make for perfect candidates if full sized cans are too big.

 

Next puncture the can to ensure there is no pressure. And then use a rotary tool disc cutter to run around the edge just on the inside of the bottom lip. The metal is thin and this is only going to take a minute or so to go around. Once you go full circle the base should just fall off and your dustcap is nearly done!

 

Now it's just a matter of cleaning up and polishing the metal. I spent more time removing the paint from the surface than any other part of the procedure, this is highly dependant on what was in the can previously. The metal inside on the ones I used is highly reflective, but it's not a complete mirror finish. This could easily be done by using a metal polisher on the surface and then sealing it with some varnish if you're so inclined.

 

Once you're happy with the finish you just need to glue them in place. I'm yet to glue mine in, they're just sitting on the speakers in the photos, but using any speaker or super glue will get them on nice and solid. One of the best things about using these for dustcaps is the strength of the metal, no  one's going to be poking these in in a hurry, thats for sure. They add very little weight to speakers and I highly doubt they'll effect the sound of the speakers, but I'll report back on that once they're on.

 

Heres some pictures of the initial ones I've made!

 

Attached File  IMG_0761.JPG   105.18K   17 downloads

 

Attached File  IMG_0762.JPG   86.69K   17 downloads

 

Attached File  IMG_0764.JPG   151.18K   13 downloads

 

I can't wait to experiment with some other types of spray cans to see what other ones will work for different types of speakers but as you can see they're pretty convincing.

 

 

 

Rock On.



#2 devol-toni

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 03:09 AM

Very clever and simple solution,

Nice going Rick  :thumbsup:



#3 redbenjoe

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 03:51 AM

Very clever and simple solution,

Nice going Rick  :thumbsup:

jeezum crow -- great scheme



#4 blu_fuz

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 06:53 AM

How can you be so nuts and so smart at the same time!? Looks good.

#5 Northerner

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 08:27 AM

That may actually be a stroke of genius!...I'm no audio expert so don't know whether it would be too much weight?...but assuming it isn't then that is very clever as we all have these cans knocking around :-D

 

Might just have to have a go at this :-)



#6 baddboybill

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 12:45 PM

Awesome job there Rick :thumbsup: my only suggestion is to glue them on very good as so they don't vibrate ;-)

#7 superlew

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 03:25 PM

Oh, that is clever. I'm also curious about the weight. Soda and beer cans could be good candidates too, as they are aluminum.

Genious! :w00t:



#8 Gluecifer

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 04:47 PM

This was my first little experiment, but I'm going to go through the other cans I've got that I haven't thrown out yet over the weekend. If you look at the bottom of them different brands can have different shapes, so I want to play with some others before I glue them on permanently. It'll also be great to have a few extra pairs for the next time I need some.

 

I highly doubt the weight will effect the speaker performance, they're only a few grams each. I am probably going to use Gorilla Glue on mine once I've settled on them, that'll keep em on forever.

 

I actually had a look at soda cans before I tried spray paint cans. Soda cans often hace numbers/letter stamped on them that you can see inside and there could be a problem mounting them as there is no seam along the bottom edge, but I encourage you to give it a try!

 

 

 

 

Rock On.



#9 Lasonic TRC-920

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 04:59 PM

(DAMN IT...I just poured soda on my self looking at the bottom of the can  :annoyed: )

 

GREAT IDEA RICK  :thumbsup: 

 

I have a set of dust covers from some 931 speakers. I was saving them for a super special occasion, because like you said I LOVE THE BIG COVERS! 

 

I'd use J1 dust covers on every radio I got if I could!

 

Very interested to read your report if there is any sound difference.



#10 Scotty_M

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 05:18 PM

What do you make of the finish on these?  The photos show them to be a bit clouded...and not a proper chrome (mirror) finish.  I might be expecting too much from an aerosol can here haha.  Genius idea though.

 

Scotty

 

Edit:  Didn't read your full post...you're yet to polish ;)



#11 baddboybill

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 06:38 PM

This was my first little experiment, but I'm going to go through the other cans I've got that I haven't thrown out yet over the weekend. If you look at the bottom of them different brands can have different shapes, so I want to play with some others before I glue them on permanently. It'll also be great to have a few extra pairs for the next time I need some.

I highly doubt the weight will effect the speaker performance, they're only a few grams each. I am probably going to use Gorilla Glue on mine once I've settled on them, that'll keep em on forever.

I actually had a look at soda cans before I tried spray paint cans. Soda cans often hace numbers/letter stamped on them that you can see inside and there could be a problem mounting them as there is no seam along the bottom edge, but I encourage you to give it a try!




Rock On.


Rick is the gorilla glue the super type glue you are planning to use. Because that might be to strong and ruin the paper and cap. :hmmm:

#12 Sazeus

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 10:50 PM

Genius, that is a brilliant idea

#13 Reli

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 11:41 PM

I would be less worried about the weight, and more worried about them stiffening the cone too much?  :hmmm:  Just speculating here.



#14 jimmyjimmy19702010

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 02:29 AM

I think maybe the steel ones would be too heavy for free cone movement. I would have thought the speakers' ability to vibrate in and out would be restricted by a heavy disc. Maybe the aluminium version would be a better choice?! 



#15 Beosystem10

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 04:29 AM

The voice coil acts as a solenoid does, so it wouldn't be restricted laterally other than by something physically tying it back, however, too much weight in the centre of the cone could, if it were greater than the weight of the original, cause the voice coil to drop radially and catch the magnet. You'd soon know though, as then the box would sound fine laid on its back but would distort and scrape horribly when vertical.

I've not tried sticking anything to a speaker cone and haven't used any glue on these other than the recommended PVA used with paper stitches to repair tears on the cones of irreplaceable mains-energised field coil speakers in vintage equipment where new cones and/or caps simply couldn't be bought from Maplins, but in theory, as long as the load is perfectly centred so it doesn't pull down on or otherwise distort the cone to the point where the coil is moved then you should get away with it.

 

But how about trying it on a speaker out of something that doesn't matter before committing to this course of action with a valuable and unique piece of kit? ;-)



#16 JustCruisin

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 07:31 AM

Me thinks those paint fumes are affecting your thought process....? :hmmm:  j/k



#17 TW5

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 12:46 AM

Great Tip  :thumbsup:

 

I will try cutting one off using

the can opener "OneTouch"

which cuts from the sides.



#18 Superduper

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 07:24 PM

The weight of speaker cones is very important, moreso for high frequency reproduction than lows. Has to do with inertia... Heavier weight is harder to initiate motion and more difficult to bring to rest. In simpler terms, harder to start and stop. For obvious reasons, high frequencies which mean much faster start/stop cycles is most likely to be affected. This is why some of the best and top performing tweeters use a kapton or Mylar ribbon -- both almost weightless. A few grams might not seem like much but try getting it to vibrate at 20,000 times/second and that's FAST!

#19 oldskool69

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 05:11 PM

I've got to agree with some of my brethren here.  The key along with the weight and ensuing stiffness is the sound.  With boomers, mids, especially vocals, are where most of the sound will come from.  There are a few boxes out there with heavy cones, my RX-C100, GX-300 are two examples.  The paper is thick and very stiff for a boombox.  However, the GX has a true crossover network, and the RX-C100 has a two inch mid tweet to compensate.  They are also in independent enclosures as well.  If you are placing these on the super woofer sections only then you may realize no significant difference other than losing some of the deeper lows due to how stiff the cone will be depending on the cap size.  Low frequencies need the freer movement.  A simple test is to take a cheap speaker and hold the cone at its mid position for a few seconds while playing music with low passages.  You'll get sound but without the low end you want.  As Norm said, those higher frequencies like fast movement and lighter materials.  But for the deep stuff, a tiny bit flex does not hurt, especially if the speaker is taken to it's limits.



#20 Kenpat

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 08:40 PM

... especially if the speaker is taken to it's limits.

And we all know how soon THAT will happen.  ;-)

Immediately, if not sooner.  At least at my house.  :lol:  I can't wait to see the new "80's color scheme" on the very "grail-ish looking" box you're working on.



#21 Gluecifer

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 02:04 AM

Right, before I get to my next results, I think you should be aware of the weight of these things. I'm not sure why a lot of you are thinking they're heavy, maybe in comparison to mylar chrome caps they are. But the weight of one from a normal spray can is 13g and from the smaller sized cans they're about 8g. This is not a substantial amount of weight to go on a speaker and certainly not enough to cause damage just from being attached.

 

The smaller can sizes are definitely the more standard size to go on most boombox speakers and I've found the Tamiya short spray paint cans have the best finish on them. I've gone over all my test dustcaps with Autosol (after rich sony_apm_fan's recommendation) and am very happy with the results. The Tamiya can (the one on the far right) is near perfect chrome reflection.

Attached File  IMG_0772.JPG   88.43K   10 downloads

 

It's a shame the middle top one didn't get cut as clean as the middle bottom one, as I'd be mounting them up for more experiments as soon as possible. I'm currently on the scrounge for more smaller paint cans I can try, heres hoping I've got another Tamiya can buried somewhere.

 

 

 

Rock On.



#22 Superduper

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 11:58 AM

Rick.  It's a great tip.  To be clear, I've installed bigger than normal dust caps myself since I'd be lying if I said looks didn't matter.   However, for the sound purist, there will definitely an effect on the sound since weight does matter a great deal.  13 grams (or 8 grams) is a significant amount and could possibly double the weight of the cones.  On the other hand, most boomboxes aren't exactly hi-fi and one would be hard pressed to notice the sound difference with the naked ear.  Also, on 2-way systems with a separate woofer, it's not as much a concern if the caps are installed on the low freq driver since the highs are the frequencies most likely to be affected anyhow.  The woofers typically have much bigger magnets and heavier cones.  I wouldn't recommend anything on the tweeter cones except mylar caps.  I'd bet if cleaned of the adhesive, mylar dust caps would have virtually unmeasurable weight.



#23 Gluecifer

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 04:47 PM

I fully understand, Norm.

These are going on the Super Woofers for a GF-777 so I doubt they'll be a good experiment to see how much difference there is in the sound before and after as I predict there'll be very little if any audible difference. Until they're on though, we won't know for sure.

 

I've still got a few more spray cans to dismember before I settle on a pair, then I'll do some full reports. This might fall over entirely and not work at all once glued on, but only going all the way will I find out for sure.

 

 

 

Rock On.



#24 Lasonic TRC-920

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 05:20 PM

Rick, great thread....any chance you could show how your cutting the cans?

 

 

I have some radios that I love, but the dust caps are so small that it ruins the effect!

 

Bigger is Better



#25 Strānj-Bōōmbŏks

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 10:27 PM

Size DOES matter!!! Love the idea brother Rick...



#26 TW5

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 04:28 AM

Got around to try this out

took 10 seconds to cut a cap out 

with a one-touch can opener

this can opener cuts from the sides not the top.

uses batteries.

this was from a small can of Lysol

 

i76is5.jpg



#27 Gluecifer

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 07:11 AM

Ohh I didn't think of using a can opener! Wayy cleaner edges!!

 

I'm still on the hunt for the perfect can to operate on. 

 

Top work, TW5!

 

 

 

Rock On.



#28 kraftmatic

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 12:44 PM

I love the creativity in this solution. Would never, ever have occurred to me to try using the bottom of an aerosol can. Even if the functional results aren't the best, the idea is brilliant.  :thumbsup:



#29 riker1068

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 10:25 AM

I love the paint job.
 



#30 Dbzerk

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Posted 27 November 2017 - 10:09 PM

Would the bottom of soda/beer/deodorant cans be lighter weight and offer more sizes?
Love the idea.
This one's going in the bank